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ARTICLE
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 182-186

Prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and malaria related anaemia among pregnant women in Abakaliki, South East Nigeria


Department of Community Medicine, Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Federal Medical Centre Abakaliki, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
E U Nwonwu
Department of Community Medicine, Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Federal Medical Centre Abakaliki, Nigeria

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


PMID: 19764671

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BACKGROUND: Malaria currently is regarded as the most common and potentially the most serious infection occurring in pregnancy in many sub Saharan African countries. This study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and malaria related anaemia among pregnant women in Abakaliki, South East, Nigeria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a cross sectional, descriptive study conducted in two tertiary health institutions in Abakaliki, South East, Nigeria (Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital And Federal Medical Centre). Using systematic sampling method, 193 pregnant women were selected from the health institutions for the study. Their blood were analysed for haemoglobin status and malaria parasite. Data were also collected using an interviewer administered questionnaire. All the data were analysed using Epi info version 6 statistical software. RESULTS: Response rate was 100%. Twenty nine percent prevalence of malaria parasitaemia was detected, more common among primigravidae. Women with higher parity had higher frequency of anaemia in pregnancy. More than half of the pregnant women (51%) were in their second trimester at the time of booking. There was no case of severe anaemia requiring blood transfusion. CONCLUSION: Our pregnant women register late for antenatal care. Prevalence of malaria parasitaemia is high in our environment as well as anaemia in pregnancy, using the standard WHO definition. It is suggested that effort should be intensified to make our women register early for antenatal care in order to identify complications early. Intermittent preventive treatment for malaria should be incorporated into routine drugs for antenatal women.


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