Medical and Dental Consultantsí Association of Nigeria
Home - About us - Editorial board - Search - Ahead of print - Current issue - Archives - Submit article - Instructions - Subscribe - Advertise - Contacts - Login 
  Users Online: 400   Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 22-26

What co-morbidities do people with malaria have and what are their patterns of health seeking in Nigeria?


1 Department of Health Administration and Management, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
2 Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Department of Health Administration and Management, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
3 Department of Community Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
4 Department of Preventive Dentistry, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria
5 Department of SIVAC Initiative, Agence de Medecine Preventive, Paris, France

Correspondence Address:
E Etiaba
Department of Health Administration and Management, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Nigeria

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1119-3077.146974

Rights and Permissions

Background: This study assessed the comorbidities associated with malaria and patterns of health seeking in southeast Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The survey was undertaken in Enugu state, Southeast Nigeria. Data were collected from 500 householders, 200 in-patient and outpatient exit surveys and data abstraction from 125 inpatient and outpatient records. Results: A total of 307 (64.2%) households had an episode of malaria within 1 month of the interview. The most common malaria comorbidities were upper respiratory tract infection and diarrhea. Most patients first sought treatment from patent medicine vendors. The average monthly cost of treating the comorbidities was 270 Naira (1.75 USD) and 601 Naira (3.89 USD) for outpatient department and inpatient department respectively. Conclusion: The economic burden of malaria is compounded by comorbidities and inappropriate health seeking behavior. Interventions to control malaria are required to also control common comorbidities.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed2032    
    Printed29    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded299    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal