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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 128-132

Oxidative stress among subjects with metabolic syndrome in Sokoto, North-Western Nigeria


1 Department of Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria
2 Department of Biochemistry, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria
3 Department of Pharmacology, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria
4 Department of Medicine, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Lagos, Nigeria
5 Department of Community Health, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria
6 Department of Medicine, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
A A Sabir
Department of Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1119-3077.173705

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Background: Oxidative stress is known to play a role in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and its components. Racial differences may exist in the level of markers of oxidative stress and antioxidants in patients with metabolic syndrome. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the oxidative stress and antioxidants status in subjects with metabolic syndrome in Sokoto, North-Western Nigeria. Methods: A cross-sectional community-based study was carried out. Two hundred subjects (96 males and 104 females) were recruited for the study using a multi-stage sampling technique. Demographic data were obtained from the participants. Evaluation of anthropometric variables, blood pressure, blood glucose levels, lipid profiles, plasma insulin levels, total antioxidant status, and oxidative stress markers was performed. Results: The subjects with metabolic syndrome had significantly higher malondialdehyde as compared to those without metabolic syndrome (236.4 [92.2] vs. 184 [63.2] nmol/l). The antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase) were significantly lower in subjects with metabolic syndrome than in those without metabolic syndrome (11.3 [4.2] vs. 13.9 [4.1] U/ml, 160[42] vs. 220[32] U/ml, and 2.12 [0.2] vs. 2.42 [0.2] U/ml, respectively). Similarly, the antioxidant Vitamins (A, C, and E) levels were significantly lower in subjects with metabolic syndrome than in those without metabolic syndrome (7.1 [4.1] vs. 7.7 [4.2] μmol/L, 225 [55.3] vs. 227.6 [62.3] μmol/L, and 75.9 [13.9] vs. 82.8 [18.6] mg/dl, respectively). There was a positive correlation between components of metabolic syndrome and free radicals. Conclusion: Significantly increased oxidative stress and diminished antioxidant defenses were found among Nigerians with metabolic syndrome.


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