Medical and Dental Consultantsí Association of Nigeria
Home - About us - Editorial board - Search - Ahead of print - Current issue - Archives - Submit article - Instructions - Subscribe - Advertise - Contacts - Login 
  Users Online: 396   Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 517-522

Early pregnancy plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels in Nigerian women and its relationship with preeclampsia


1 Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
I C Udenze
Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1119-3077.183256

Rights and Permissions

Aim: This study compared early plasma levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia and determined its relationship with disease severity. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 195 normotensive, aproteinuric pregnant women without prior history of gestational hypertension. The women were attending the Antenatal Clinic at The Lagos University Teaching Hospital and were within 24 weeks gestation at recruitment. The outcome measures were PAI-1, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and significant proteinuria. The endpoint of the study was the development of preeclampsia. The diagnosis of preeclampsia was made by the attending Obstetrician. The data were analyzed using the IBM SPSS statistical software. Statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Results: First trimester PAI-1 levels were significantly higher in the women who later developed preeclampsia compared to those who had a normal pregnancy (P < 0.0001). In these group of women who later developed preeclampsia, PAI-1 had an inverse relationship with gestational age (r = 0.878) whereas in normal pregnancy, PAI-1 and gestational age had a direct relationship (r = 0.017). Second trimester systolic and DBP values were also significantly higher in the women who later developed preeclampsia compared to normal pregnancy, P = 0.007 and 0.004, respectively. There was, however, no correlation between PAI-1 values and SBP, DBP and proteinuria in the women who developed preeclampsia. Conclusion: Plasma levels of PAI-1 are increased early in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, but the lack of correlation of this marker with disease severity may limit its clinical utility.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1285    
    Printed39    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded103    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal