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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 9  |  Page : 1180-1188

Health-related quality of life in people with chronic diseases managed in a low-resource setting – A study from South East Nigeria


1 Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Ituku-Ozalla Campus, Enugu, Nigeria
2 Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Enugu, Nigeria
3 Department of Anaesthesia/Pain & Palliative Care Unit, Multidisciplinary Oncology Centre, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Ituku-Ozalla Campus, Enugu, Nigeria
4 Sub-Department of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Ituku-Ozalla Campus, Enugu, Nigeria
5 Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Ituku-Ozalla Campus, Enugu, Nigeria
6 Department of Medical Physiology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. N N Unaogu
Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Enugu
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njcp.njcp_29_19

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Background: Assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in resource-limited settings is critical to evaluate and improve the burden of morbidity and mortality associated with chronic medical disorders. There is a dearth of data on HRQOL among patients suffering from chronic medical disorders in Nigeria. This study assessed the HRQOL of participants with diabetes mellitus (DM), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and cancer in a hospital setting with limited resources and highlighted associated factors. Methods: The WHOQOL-BREF instrument was used to study a cross section of the participants at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu. Data were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS). Results: The distribution of the 613 study population was diabetes mellitus 120, HIV 389, and various cancers 104. Majority (67.9%) earned less than $1 per day and only 7.5% had any form of health insurance. The HIV group had higher QoL scores. Younger age, higher educational status, being employed, and having a care giver were positively associated with higher QoL. Patients with no comorbidities (76.6%) had an overall higher QoL score. Conclusion: Majority of the patients living with chronic medical diseases in Enugu, Nigeria were poor, vulnerable, and without access to health insurance. People living HIV generally had better quality life than those with other health conditions. There is a huge unmet need for people living with chronic medical conditions in Nigeria, which require strategies to counteract.


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