Medical and Dental Consultantsí Association of Nigeria
Home - About us - Editorial board - Search - Ahead of print - Current issue - Archives - Submit article - Instructions - Subscribe - Advertise - Contacts - Login 
  Users Online: 1161   Home Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size
 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 23  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 729-733

ABO blood group as a biomarker of preeclampsia among antenatal clinic attendees in Nigeria


1 Department of Haematology and Immunology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria/University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla Campus, Enugu, Nigeria State, Nigeria
2 Department of Haematology and Immunology, Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria
3 Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria/University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla Campus, Enugu, Nigeria State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. A O Ugwu
Department of Haematology and Immunology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria/University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla Campus, Enugu State. PMB 01129. Postal Code 400001
Nigeria
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/njcp.njcp_48_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: The clinical application of the ABO blood group is not limited to transfusion medicine but extends to other aspects of medicine. Its impact on preeclampsia is controversial. Aim: To determine the association of ABO blood group type with preeclampsia. Subjects and Methods: This was a cross-sectional analytical study of 66 women with preeclampsia and 81 apparently healthy women controls carried out in a tertiary health institution. The case and control groups were consecutively recruited during antenatal clinic visits and matched for age, parity, and gestational age. Data on demographics and the ABO blood group of the two groups of individuals were obtained. The analysis was both descriptive and inferential using the statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 21 (Chicago Il, USA). A P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The mean age of the participants was 30.6 (4.9), 95% CI: 27.76–33.95. The majority of the women were ≤40 years (98.5%) and multigravidae constituted 81.8%. Forty-six (69.7%) women with preeclampsia had blood group O and 20 (30.3%) had a non-O blood group. Forty-nine (60.5%) of the controls had blood group O and 32 (39.5%) had a non-O blood group. The observed difference was not statistically significant (OR 1.50; 95% CI: 0.75–3.0; P = 0.26). The odds ratio for developing preeclampsia was 0.83 (95% CI: 0.37–1.91; P = 0.67) for the primigravidae. The non-O blood groups were more likely to present with symptoms than the O group (P < 0.01). Twenty-six (39.4%) women with preeclampsia had a mild disease while 40 (60.6%) had severe disease. Conclusion: Women with non-O blood groups are not at increased risk of developing preeclampsia but are more likely to be symptomatic than the O group.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed74    
    Printed1    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded32    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal