Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 18  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 516--521

Co-infections of hepatitis B and C with human immunodeficiency virus among adult patients attending human immunodeficiency virus outpatients clinic in Benin City, Nigeria


CK Ojide1, EI Kalu2, E Ogbaini-Emevon3, VU Nwadike4 
1 Department of Medical Microbiology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria
2 Department of Medical Microbiology, Federal Medical Centre, Umuahia, Abia State, Nigeria
3 Institute of Lassa Fever Research, Irua Specialist Hospital, Irua, Edo State, Nigeria
4 Department of Medical Microbiology, Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
C K Ojide
Department of Medical Microbiology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State
Nigeria

Background: Hepatitis B and C viral co-infections with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are known to affect progression, management, and outcome of HIV infection. This study was aimed to access the prevalence of hepatitis B and C co-infections in HIV-infected adult patients in the University of Benin Teaching Hospital with a view of understanding the gravity of this problem in the local population. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on 342 HIV-infected adult patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy attending HIV Outpatients Clinic of University of Benin Teaching Hospital, between April and September, 2011. Patients«SQ» sera were screened for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) using immunochromatographic-based kits. Clinical stage of HIV and CD4+ cell counts were equally evaluated. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 17. Results: Of the 324 HIV-infected patients screened, 53 (15.5%) were positive for HBsAg, 24 (7.0%) positive for hepatitis C virus antibodies (HCV-Ab), while 2 (0.6%) were positive for both viruses. Seroprevalence of HBsAg was higher in male (17.8%) than in female (14.7%) (χ2 = 0.49, P = 0.49), while the reverse is the case for HCV-Ab; 7.1% for female and 6.7% for male (χ2 = 0.02, P = 0.88). Seroprevalences of HBsAg and HCV-Ab were also higher among patients in World Health Organization disease stages 3-4 and patients with CD4+ cell count ≤200 cell/ml compared to those in stages 1-2 and with CD4+ cell count >200 cell/ml. Conclusion: Co-infection with hepatitis B virus and HCV among HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients is still a problem in our environment. Screening for these viruses among HIV/AIDS patients will allow for early detection and proper management.


How to cite this article:
Ojide C K, Kalu E I, Ogbaini-Emevon E, Nwadike V U. Co-infections of hepatitis B and C with human immunodeficiency virus among adult patients attending human immunodeficiency virus outpatients clinic in Benin City, Nigeria.Niger J Clin Pract 2015;18:516-521


How to cite this URL:
Ojide C K, Kalu E I, Ogbaini-Emevon E, Nwadike V U. Co-infections of hepatitis B and C with human immunodeficiency virus among adult patients attending human immunodeficiency virus outpatients clinic in Benin City, Nigeria. Niger J Clin Pract [serial online] 2015 [cited 2020 Jul 15 ];18:516-521
Available from: http://www.njcponline.com/article.asp?issn=1119-3077;year=2015;volume=18;issue=4;spage=516;epage=521;aulast=Ojide;type=0