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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 364-367

Experience in the management of the mass casualty from the January 2010 Jos Crisis


1 Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Accident and Emergency Unit, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria
2 Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma, Head and Neck Surgery, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria
3 Department of Ear Nose and Throat, Head and Neck Surgery, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
K N Ozoilo
Department of Surgery, Division of Trauma Surgery, Accident and Emergency Unit, Jos University Teaching Hospital, P. M. B. 2076, Jos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1119-3077.179276

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Background: On the 17 of January 2010, a sectarian crisis broke out in Jos the capital of Plateau state, Nigeria. It created a mass casualty situation in the Jos University Teaching Hospital. We present the result of the hospital management of that mass casualty incident. Objective: To share our experience in the management of the mass casualty situation arising from the sectarian crisis of Jos in January 2010. Methodology: We retrospectively reviewed the hospital records of patients who were treated in our hospital with injuries sustained in the Jos crisis of January 2010. Results: A total of 168 patients presented over a four day period. There were 108 males (64.3%) and 60 females (35.7%). The mean age was 26 ± 16 years. Injury was caused by gunshots in 68 patients (40.5%), machete in 56 (33.3%), falls in 22 (13.1%) and burning in 21 (13.1%). The body parts injured were the upper limbs in 61(36.3%) patients, lower limbs 44 (26.2%) and scalp 43 (25.6%). Majority, 125 (74.4%) did not require formal operative care. Fourteen (8.3%) patients had complications out of which 10 (6.0%) were related to infections. There were 5 (3.1%) hospital mortalities and the mean duration of hospital stay was 4.2 days. The hospital operations returned to routine 24 hours after the last patient was brought in. As a result of changes made to our protocol, management proceeded smoothly and there was no stoppage of the hospital response at any point. Conclusion: This civil crisis involved mostly young males. Injuries were mainly lacerations from machete and gunshot injuries. Majority of the victims did not require formal surgical operations beyond initial care. Maintaining continuity in the positions of the Incident commander and the mass casualty commander ensure a smooth disaster response with fewer challenges.


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