Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2016  |  Volume : 19  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 272--277

Self-perceived oral health and whole salivary immunoglobulin G levels in habitual gutka-chewers and nonchewers


FA Alshehri1, AA Al-Kheraif2, KM Aldosary3, F Vohra4, H Malmstrom5, GE Romanos6, F Javed5 
1 Department of Periodontics and Community Dentistry, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Dental Health, Dental Biomaterials Research Chair, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Dental, University Hospitals, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
4 Department of Dentistry, Jinah Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan; Department of Prosthetic Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
5 Division of General Dentistry, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA
6 Department of Periodontology, School of Dental Medicine, Stony Brook University, NY, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. F Javed
Division of General Dentistry, Eastman Institute for Oral Health, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642
USA

Objective: To assess self-perceived oral health and whole salivary immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels among habitual gutka-chewers and nonchewers (controls). Materials and Methods: Fifty gutka-chewers and fifty controls were included. Demographic data and self-perceived oral health status (pain in teeth, pain on chewing, bleeding gums (BG), bad breath, loose teeth and daily oral hygiene protocols) were collected using a questionnaire. Unstimulated whole saliva (UWS) was collected and unstimulated whole salivary flow rate (UWSFR) was determined. Whole salivary IgG levels were determined using standard techniques. Odds ratios were calculated for oral symptoms and group differences in protein levels were compared using one-way analysis of variance (α± <5%). Results: BG was more often reported by gutka-chewers than controls (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in UWSFR and self-perceived pain in teeth, pain on chewing, bad breath and loose teeth among gutka-chewers and controls. IgG levels were significantly higher among gutka-chewers than controls (P < 0.01). Among gutka-chewers, whole salivary IgG levels were comparable individuals with and without self-perceived oral symptoms. Among controls, IgG levels in UWS were significantly higher among individuals who had BG than those who did not (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Self-perceived oral health is worse and whole salivary IgG levels are higher in gutka-chewers compared to controls.


How to cite this article:
Alshehri F A, Al-Kheraif A A, Aldosary K M, Vohra F, Malmstrom H, Romanos G E, Javed F. Self-perceived oral health and whole salivary immunoglobulin G levels in habitual gutka-chewers and nonchewers.Niger J Clin Pract 2016;19:272-277


How to cite this URL:
Alshehri F A, Al-Kheraif A A, Aldosary K M, Vohra F, Malmstrom H, Romanos G E, Javed F. Self-perceived oral health and whole salivary immunoglobulin G levels in habitual gutka-chewers and nonchewers. Niger J Clin Pract [serial online] 2016 [cited 2021 Sep 17 ];19:272-277
Available from: https://www.njcponline.com/article.asp?issn=1119-3077;year=2016;volume=19;issue=2;spage=272;epage=277;aulast=Alshehri;type=0